THE OFFICIAL BLOG OF THE George R. Farmer, jr. law Library

Professor Jennifer Oliva Rewrites Does v. Gillespie for U.S. Feminist Judgments Project

West Virginia University associate professor of law and public health Jennifer D. Oliva is contributing to the U.S. Feminist Judgments Project by rewriting Does v. Gillespie with University of Wyoming law professor Melissa Ballengee Alexander. The case deals with the issue of whether Medicaid beneficiaries have the right to bring a private cause of action under the Medicaid statute’s free choice of provider provision to challenge a state agency’s decision to terminate a qualified Medicaid provider. The U.S. Feminist Judgments Project is a collaborative effort of more than 100 feminist law professors to rewrite U.S. legal decisions from a feminist perspective. They have produced a series of volumes of rewritten opinions in the areas of constitutional law, tax, torts, corporations, trusts and estates, employment discrimination, family law, and reproductive justice.

Professor Oliva participated in a workshop on December 7, 2018 with other commentators and opinion writers at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

Professors Fershée and Van Nostrand Publish Chapters in New Environmental Law Institute Book

West Virginia University law professors Joshua Fershée and James Van Nostrand each contributed chapters to a new book published by the Environmental Law Institute. The book is titled Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States: Summary and Key Recommendations, edited by Michael B. Gerrard and John C. Dernbach. The book is a precursor to a full length publication to appear in early 2019. Summary and Key Recommendations provides thumbnail summaries and critical recommendations from each of the chapters in the larger volume.

Professor Fershée co-authored Chapter 14: Light Duty Vehicles with Professor Amy Stein of the University of Florida College of Law. Professor Van Nostrand authored Chapter 27: Production and Delivery of Bioenergy Fuels.

Professor Valarie Blake Rewrites Doe v. Mutual of Omaha for U.S. Feminist Judgments Project

West Virginia University law professor Valarie Blake is contributing to the U.S.Feminist Judgments Project by rewriting Doe v. Mutual of Omaha. The case deals with the issue of whether the Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits private insurers from discriminating against patients with AIDS. The U.S. Feminist Judgments Project is a collaborative effort of more than 100 feminist law professors to rewrite U.S. legal decisions from a feminist perspective. They have produced a series of volumes of rewritten opinions in the area tax, torts, corporations, trusts and estates, employment discrimination, family law, and reproductive justice. 

Professor Blake participated in a workshop on December 7, 2018 with other commentators and opinion writers at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

Professor Joshua Weishart cited by Delaware Court of Chancery

West Virginia University College of Law professor Joshua Weishart's research was recently cited the by Delaware Court of Chancery. In Delawarians for Educational Opportunity v. Carney, the court ruled that the state constitution “obligates the state of Delaware to create and maintain a system of public schools that successfully educates Delaware’s students.” In support of its decision to deny a motion to dismiss the case, the court cites two of Professor Weishart's law review articles for the following:

“It is not possible to divorce a mandate to establish and maintain a system of public schools from the expectation that the schools will educate the students who attend them.” See Joshua E. Weishart, Aligning Education Rights and Remedies, 27 Kan. J.L. & Pub. Pol’y 346, 360-61 (2018).

Professor Valarie Blake Presents at 2018-2019 Utah Law Review Symposium

West Virginia University College of Law professor Valarie Blake presented at the Utah Law Review Symposium on Friday, November 30, 2018. The symposium is titled "The Opioid Crisis: Paths Forward to Mitigate Regulatory Failure". The symposium was designed to examine failures of the pharmaceutical market, inadequate regulatory responses, and possible solutions. Scholars discussed the impact of regulation from the national and state level, the impact of addiction on communities, and how public health research should inform future policy and regulation decisions.

Professor Blake participated in a panel discussion, "State Regulation: Failures and Paths Moving Forward".